Tag Archives: Native Wisdom

THE PLAYER OF THE VOID

The Owl flies at night

Brings good luck to the player of the void

(Owl Song)

 

If you go where no man goes

You find what no man finds

He’s moving on like an Owl in the night

The player of the void

 

He sees at night, a diamond shining bright

The player of the void

He falls to the Earth, to kiss it on the lips

Then soars back to the sky

 

You’re here I know, been here all my life, waiting by the door

To the land of the shining silver plain, on the other side

 

He knows his pain is the cracking of his shell

And faces night with day

To face the dark with faith and grace

To live the passion play

 

He flies at night

The player of the void

And waits outside my door

© 1997 Martin H. Wilde

Not Alone

He told me

“Son, its lonely on the path”

This, after I shared with him

My terror at the possibility

Of being destroyed

 

He told me

“We have fear, because we have no power.

The closest thing to power is choice

As our awareness broadens with time

It informs our choices more completely”

 

I got off the phone and thought

Thank God for that man

I am not alone.

 

In memory of “Jim”

(James Marvin Gordon, November 17, 1935-August 22, 2011)

© 2016 Martin H. Wilde

Owl Medicine

Owls – Symbology and Mythology.
(Cailleach, Oidhche, Comachag)

The word “cailleach” in the Scottish-Gaelic means old woman!, “coileach-oidhche” is the word for owl, believe it or not it means “night-cockerel”! These birds were most often associated with the Crone aspect of the Goddess. The owl is often a guide to and through the Underworld, a creature of keen sight in darkness, and a silent and swift hunter. It can help unmask those who would deceive you or take advantage of you.

Owls are believed to have played a more prominent role in early Celtic cults, and could perhaps have derived from a more broadly based deity of a common European descent. Predating the Greek cult of Athene, for whom the owl was an animal attribute, were images of these mysterious birds in Celtic lands.

Owls are believed to be a sacred animal to the famed Cult of the Head. They often appear with human heads and with bovines, such as rams and bulls, all of which have been determined by scholars to be objects of this strange cult. In modern Scottish and Welsh languages, the owl, by the etymology of the word alone carries negative connotations of death and darkness. Then, in later Gallo-Roman times the Owl lost its cult significance, but has been linked to a Celtic goddess associated with fertility.

The most famous myth dealing with the owl is in the story of Bloudeuwedd, contained in the Mabinogi. Lleu, one of the central characters of the story has a wife created for him by the magician Gwydion, because his mother forbade by her own word that he would never marry any ordinary woman. Bloudeuwedd is her name, and as the tale goes she tricks Lleu into divulging the secret to his own mortality, convincing him to even demonstrate how.
In the process, Bloudeuwedd then kills Lleu, who avenges his death by turning her in and owl, from which she receives her namesake in Gaelic.

A prime example of owl imagery are the handle fittings found with a famous cauldron found in Bra, Jutland that dates to the 3rd century B. C.. The cauldron was found in a bog in Bra, and was believed to have been a votive offering that was broken into pieces before it was deposited. When put together, the cauldron spanned over a meter in diameter and was adorned by several owls and bulls heads.

In the Celtic style, the fitting bears the face of an owl through an arrangement of shapes that terminate at the end of some columnar tendril designs. This owl is typical of La Tène work and is defined by the large eyes and sharp, curved beak that stand forth from background of intertwining designs.

In Ancient Greek mythology the Owl was a creature sacred to Athena, Goddess of the night who represented wisdom. Athena, the Greek Goddess of Wisdom had a companion Owl on her shoulder, which revealed unseen truths to her. Owl had the ability to light up Athena’s blind side, enabling her to speak the whole truth, as opposed to only a half truth. The Ainu in Japan trust the Owl because it gives them notice of evil approaching. They revere the Owl, and believe it mediates between the Gods and men. The bird features prominently Celtic folklore where it is considered both to be sacred and to have magical powers, again because of its abilities in the dark. Zulus and other West African nations consider the bird a powerful influence in casting spells, and think that using parts of the owl gives great strength to a person involved with magical incantations.

To the Welsh, the Owl is a night predator — the only bird capable of defeating the swift falcon and then only at dusk, its time of power. The Owl symbolizes death and renewal, wisdom, moon magick, and initiations. Their Goddess Arianrhod shapeshifts into a large Owl, and through the great Owl-eyes, sees even into the darkness of the human subconscious and soul. She is said to move with strength and purpose through the night, her wings of comfort and healing spread to give solace to those who seek her. A star and moon Goddess, Arianrhod was also called the Silver Wheel because the dead were carried on her Oar Wheel to Emania (the Moon-land or land of death), which belonged to her as a deity of reincarnation and karma. The Mother aspect of the Triple Goddess in Wales, her palace was Caer Arianrhod (Aurora Borealis), or the secret center of each initiate’s spiritual being.

However, many cultures have focused on the dark side of the Owl’s symbolism. People have always been suspicious of the Owl because of man’s fear of the dark, or night, and those things that might dwell there. In general, the hooting of an Owl is considered a portent of death or bad luck, and it may even prophesize death, as the death of Dido was foretold. It is a medical fact that most people die at night, and for that reason also the Owl has been seen as the messenger of death.

In the Middle East, China, and Japan, the Owl is considered as both a bad omen and an evil spirit. For Christians the Owl traditionally signifies the Devil, powers of evil, bad news, and destruction. Similarly, in the Old Testament the Owl is an unclean creature that stands alone as a figure of desolation. In an Australian Aboriginal myth the Owl is the messenger of bad news. Yama, the Verdic God of death, sometimes sent out the Owl as his emissary.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas consider the Owl to be the Night Eagle because it is silent and deadly in flight, and is a solitary bird with all-seeing eyes. The Owl is generally regarded as a bird of sorcerers because of its association with–and abilities in–the dark. It symbolizes deception and silent observation because it flies noiselessly. The Owl is feared by peoples who believe that the death warning is in its hoot.

In the Navajo belief system, the Owl is the envoy of the supernatural world and earth-bound spirits. The Pawnee understand the Owl as the Chief of the Night and believe that it affords protection. The Cherokee honor the bird as sacred because of its night-time vision, and wish to draw that power to themselves to see in the dark.

Symbolism
Perception, Silent Observation, Wisdom, Deception

The Owl has a dual symbolism of wisdom and darkness, the latter meaning evil and death. They are symbolically associated with clairvoyance, astral projection and magick, and is oftentimes the medicine of sorcerers and witches, you are drawn to magickal practices. Those who have owl medicine will find that these night birds will tend to collect around you, even in daytime, because they recognise a kinship with you.

The two main symbolic characteristics of the Owl, its wisdom and its nocturnal activity– have made it represent perception. Considering perception in a spiritual context, Owl medicine is related to psychism, occult matters, instincts, and clairvoyance– the true ability to see what is happening around you.

The owl can see that which others cannot, which is the essence of true wisdom. Where others are deceived, Owl sees and knows what is there.

Use your power of keen, silent observation to intuit some life situation, Owl is befriending you and aiding you in seeing the whole truth. The Owl also brings its messages in the night through dreams or meditation. Pay attention to the signals and omens. The truth always brings further enlightenment.

The Owl, symbol of the Goddess, represents perfect wisdom. Owls have the ability to see in the dark and fly noiselessly through the skies. They bring messages through dreams. The Owl is the bird of mystical wisdom and ancient knowledge of the powers of the moon. With wide-open, all-seeing eyes, Owl looks upon reality without distortion and acknowledges it, yet is aware that with ancient magickal and spiritual knowledge, he or she can make changes.

Medicine Cards: Fox

Fox: Camouflage

Wiley Fox has many allies in the woodlands, including the foliage, which offers protection and much medicine. Fox is seemingly able to vanish amidst the lush undergrowth of the forest. This flora is Fox’s ally. The ability to meld into one’s surroundings and be unnoticed is a powerful gift when one is observing the activities of others.

Another natural gift of Fox is the ability to adapt to winter by changing color, like the chameleon. Its rich, white, winter coat allows Fox to blend into the snow when the leaves no longer linger. Fox medicine involves adaptability, cunning, observation, integration, and swiftness of thought and action. These traits may also include quick decisiveness, and sure-footedness in the physical world.

Fox’s ability to be unseen allows it to be the protector of the family unit. If danger arises, Fox is johnny-on-the- spot. Nanih Waiya, Great Spirit in the Choctaw tongue, honors Fox with the duty of keeping the family together and safe. This is accomplished through Fox’s ability to observe undetected, without making others self-conscious. Fox is always concerned with the safety of family members and is an excellent talisman for those traveling far afield.

If Fox has chosen to share its medicine with you, it is a sign that you are to become like the wind, which is unseen yet is able to weave into and through any location or situation. You would be wise to observe the acts of others rather that their words at this time. Use your cunning nature in a positive way; keep silent about who and what and why you are observing. In learning the art of camouflage, you need to test your ability to pull this off.

One test of exercise that may be helpful to you is deciding to be invisible. In doing this exercise, you might try to visualize your body as part of your surroundings, full of the colors of the location you are in. See yourself in your mind’s eye, moving with stealth and grace, unheeded by others. If you do it right, it works! You can leave a party unnoticed or become as unobtrusive as a piece of furniture, watching the developing drama of the subjects you are studying.

While learning from Fox, you might also gain confidence in your ability to know instantly what will happen next. After observing for a while, you will become aware of a certain predictability in given situations and be able to quickly make your move. Fox medicine teaches the art of Oneness through its understanding of camouflage. This applies on all levels, from rocks to God. With Fox medicine, you are being asked to see all types of uses for Oneness.

Much like the clowns at the rodeo, Fox can keep the raging bull from stampeding a friend or family member. Fox can use silly tactics as a brilliant camouflage move. No one could guess the sly power behind such ingenious maneuvers.

Contrary
Watch out for wiley Fox if this card has appeared reversed! Someone may be watching you, and trying to figure out your next move. If you look deeper, however, it may be that you are watching yourself to prove to yourself that you exist. If you have a “wallflower” to the point of disappearing, you may need to decide that you are worth noticing.

Contrary Fox is as foolish as it is cunning, and you may have fooled yourself into believed that your low self-esteem is due to your being born plain or having an ordinary life. This is camouflage of a different sort, in that you have camouflaged your true desire to experience life with friends, with you, and with purpose. In any case, you are put on notice to be aware of apathy and self-induced boredom. You may have to dig deeply to find what excites you enough to scurry across the wasteland of your dulled senses and live.

Contrary Fox may also be telling you that you have become too visible. In climbing to a place of recognition, oftentimes the envy or jealousness of others is thrown in your face. If you are feeling attacked, withdraw. It may be time to assume the attitude of the hermit and deck yourself in the cloak of invisibility.

To right contrary Fox in this situation, call on Armadillo and name your boundaries. Then call on the family’s protector to show you the art of camouflage. Once out of the line of attack, you can resume the role of being your “foxy” self.

Become Fox and feel the joy of knowing the playground of your life. You may just find the chicken coop full of intriguing morsels of delight.

Overview
Fox is associated with cunning, primarily because f its ability to observe the movements of others without being seen. As a power animal, Fox stresses the power of adaptability and integration coupled with the quality of quick-thinking and decisiveness when the time is ripe.

Power animals always express the positive aspects of the characteristics they share with their physical counterparts, and Fox is not exception. Fox as a power animal teaches not the cunning of deceitfulness, but kenning of discretion; not the wilyness of being sly, but the willingness of being unobtrusive. It also stresses the importance of waiting patiently for the appropriate opportunity to make your move.

It is possible that your principal problems derive from your desire to prove yourself, and to make your presence felt. If you are feeling threatened, or the victim of controversy and criticism, or envy and jealousy, you are in need of Fox’s help in becoming less noticeable and in achieving your aims unheeded and unimpeded by others. Camouflage and be less noticeable.

Blend in. Avoid being the center of attention. Become protective when needed.

Source: Sams, Jamie and Carson, David. Medicine Cards (Santa Fe: Bear and Company, 1988).

You lose yourself you reappear

Can I be reclaimed from the place I fade into?
Under the weight of survival
In the shadow of competition
Under the lust of power
Never again the crying boy

I go sleep in the mountains in the shade of nature
Under the watch of the Universe
In the sound of wind
Under the light of sun
A Myrddin trance

A field mouse quits fighting another
Over a seed
And sees the stars
What are the stars?

“You lose yourself you reappear you suddenly find you’ve got nothing to fear” ==Bob Dylan

© 2015 Martin H Wilde

Excerpt 27 – Expanding

Spiritual seeking or seeking God is a quest into the unknown; that which is beyond your current understanding. It is about expanding.

It is important that God is unknown. The more we try to pretend we “know” God, the less honest the quest becomes.

We are not supposed to feel safe and secure – life is insecure. Instead we put insecurity aside and honestly seek.

This is the day of the expanding man
I take one last drag as I approach the stand
==Donald Fagen

 

Excerpt 26 – Enlightenment

As opposed to achieving some fixed form of high wisdom, I think enlightenment is more the idea that insight comes on an as-needed, when-needed basis. And that it is not to be treated as currency, nor can one be materialistic with it.

This is my complaint with traditional religion. The idea that if you are a good boy, and save up all your good deeds [ideas] you get some sort of cumulative reward for being a good spiritual materialist.

Instead I’m leaning more toward the idea of seasons, timing, alignment of factors, instinct, intuition. I think intuition is the sum total of many instantaneous surges of enlightenment. They become imprinted on your being and are later there but not as intellect but more-so as intuition. They inform your choices which could be seen as enlightenment in action.

Excerpt 25 – The quest for Intimacy

It is intimacy that I have been seeking and intimacy that has been lost. I feel unified when somebody “gets me” and devastated when that intimacy is taken away or replaced by false intimacy.

To create intimacy one must become vulnerable and share the truth about who one is. It is this risk that sets the tone for others to reciprocate by also getting real. The bond of one person being real and another reciprocating by being real is intimacy.

Intimacy is destroyed by fear, selfishness, judgement, power games, pride and the pursuit of comfort and intoxication. I have been left alone by others who bail on the intimacy, so maybe all intimacy must end and the only constant is the intimacy of ones self with ones truth and ones world – with no claims on others.

Excerpt 24 – Pains-taking

To consistently stand up to another persons untrue behavior with truth is noble and potentially helpful to a person who seeks change. But for those who allow fear to take them back from their path, you are doing that persons’ work for them and they do not develop. You become the focus of their dysfunctional behavior and are often punished for your kindnesses.

Today I release others to the dark and light powers so they may be molded as the universe sees fit. I will feel my way through the pain of letting go, until I reach the other side.

Sobriety

Sobriety means facing life honestly and directly.

Honesty means seeking the truth of who you are and then being it.

It is my job to be the man I am, in this universe, on this day.

==Marty Wilde