Category Archives: Warrior Medicine

Artemis

Artemis, also known as Diana, is a Greek Goddess of the Moon whose roots extend back to Her time as a many-breasted mother goddess. We know her better as the maiden Huntress who lives in the forest with her band of young girls (the Arktoi) and her totem animals of Deer and Dog. As a virgin goddess, she is whole unto herself and teaches us to live our wild, instinctive nature, and at the same time, honor our sisterhood.

The Authentic Offering

Communion with the Great Primal Other is made possible through an authentic sacrifice or offering. It is not necessary that the offering be perfect, but it is essential that the offering is authentic.

The authentic offering makes it possible to move from literal space to ritual space. It is in ritual space that the Great Primal Other can provide the energy that powers the spiritual transformation.

Holding the tension of the opposites

To quote Carl Jung, “All opposites are of God, therefore man must bend to this burden; and in so doing he finds that God in his “oppositeness” has taken possession of him, incarnated himself in him. He becomes a vessel filled with divine conflict.”

Jung says it is crucial at this point to “hold the tension of the opposites.”

When the opposites first get constellated, there can be wide oscillations between the two polarities; this can at times look like manic-depression. If the person doesn’t have a strong enough sense of self, which is to not have a strong enough alchemical container, they will split-off, repress and project out one of the pairs of opposites and identify with the other. Instead of a reconciling symbol arising, symptoms result.

If a person is able to hold both opposites simultaneously, it can be an excruciating experience. Jung points out that, symbolically, this is a veritable crucifixion. This is to be genuinely imitating Christ.

“It is no longer an effort, an intentional striving after imitation, but rather an involuntary experience of the reality represented by the sacred legend.”==Jung

“Again, the devil took Him up on an exceedingly high mountain, and showed Him all the kingdoms of the world and their glory. And he said to Him, “All these things I will give You if You will fall down and worship me.” Then Jesus said to him, “Away with you, Satan! For it is written, ‘You shall worship the LORD your God, and Him only you shall serve.’ “
== Matthew 4:8

Morning Prayer

I pray to the North for the difficulties in life that force me to reach deeper to resources that can sustain me. The darkness that strips down my false self, and leaves only my true self. Sipistu Bok-sa-put.

I pray to the east, to the rising sun, the opening door, for the new beginnings that always come. The light at the end of the darkness. The inventive self. The new ideas. For hope. Lugh Bok-sa-put.

I pray to the south for the good times, For love, patience, tenderness and responsibility. The warmth and the little community that I serve. The healing, the mid-day. For woman power tenacity, endurance and the ability to overlook the minor issues in favor of the big picture. Dana Bok-sa-put.

I pray to the west for the endings. The wisdom that comes from seeing things through to completion. The process of growing old. Faith, courage and the way of spirit. Siyeh Bok-sa-put.

I pray above to the Grandfathers for stregnth and clarity. Jim Gordon Bok-sa-put. Leo Surechief Bok-sa-put. Thomas Jackson Bok-sa-put.

I pray below to the grandmothers for love tenderness patience and responsibility. Shirley Morgan Bok-sa-put. Lyla Dwello Bok-sa-put. Sara Jackson Bok-sa-put.

I pray to the universe. You are all I want. You are all I am. Of myself I am nothing, you doeth the works. You are the dark and the light. You are the yin and the Yang. You are all power. Show me the currents just out ahead and give me knowledge of what you would have me do. Myrddyn Bok-sa-put.

Myrddin Wyllt

Myrddin Wyllt (Welsh: [ˈmərðɪn ˈwɨɬt]), Myrddin Emrys, Merlinus Caledonensis, or Merlin Sylvestris[1] (a legendary figure associated in some sources with events in the sixth century), is a figure in medieval Welsh legend, known as a prophet and a madman. He is the most important prototype for the modern composite image of Merlin, the wizard from Arthurian legend.

Texts about Myrddin Wyllt have similarities to an account of a north-British figure called Lailoken. He was probably born sometime around or in AD 540, and is said to have had a twin sister called Gwendydd or Gwenddydd or Languoreth. Myrddin Wyllt is said to have gone mad after the Battle of Arfderydd at Arthuret, which was waged between the victor Rhydderch Hael or Riderch I of Alt Clut and Gwenddoleu in AD 573.[1] He fled into the forest and lived with the animals. There he is said to have found his gift of prophecy.[citation needed]

Myrddin reportedly prophesied his own death, which would happen by falling, stabbing, and drowning. This was fulfilled when a gang of jeering shepherds drove him off a cliff, where he was impaled on a stake left by fishermen, and died with his head below water. His grave is reputed to lie near the River Tweed in the village of Drumelzier near Peebles, although nothing remains above ground level at the site.[1] This strange threefold death is a theme common to many Indo-European mythologies, and according to Georges Dumezil suggests a strong threefold division in Proto-Indo-European religion.

In Welsh literature

The ‘altarstone’ in Stobo Kirk on which Merlin was converted to Christianity.[1]

The earliest (pre-12th century) Welsh poems that concern the Myrddin legend present him as a madman living an existence in the Caledonian Forest but said to be born in Carmarthen South Wales. Carmarthen in the Welsh language is Caerfyrddin; caer translates into English as “fort”. When Britannia was a Roman province, Carmarthen was the civitas capital of the Demetae tribe, known as Moridunum (from Brittonic *mori-dunon meaning “sea fort”). Legend has it that second part of the towns name fyrddin was representative as Myrddin and of his place of birth, Caer-fyrddin (Fort-Merlin). There he ruminates on his former existence and the disaster that brought him low: the death of his lord Gwenddoleu, whom he served as bard. The allusions in these poems serve to sketch out the events of the Battle of Arfderydd, where Riderch Hael, King of Alt Clut (Strathclyde) slaughtered the forces of Gwenddoleu, and Myrddin went mad watching this defeat. The Annales Cambriae date this battle to AD 573,[2] and name Gwenddoleu’s adversaries as the sons of Eliffer, presumably Gwrgi and Peredur.[3]

A version of this legend is preserved in a late fifteenth-century manuscript in a story called Lailoken and Kentigern, which probably happened in August 584, after Myrddin, also known as Lailoken, had finished writing his prophecies in July of that year. In this narrative, St. Kentigern meets in a deserted place with a naked, hairy madman who is called Lailoken, although said by some to be called Merlynum or Merlin, who declares that he has been condemned for his sins to wander in the company of beasts. He adds that he had been the cause for the deaths of all of the persons killed in the battle fought on the plain between Liddel and Carwannok. Having told his story, the madman leaps up and flees from the presence of the saint back into the wilderness. He appears several times more in the narrative until at last asking St. Kentigern for the Sacrament, prophesying that he was about to die a triple death. After some hesitation, the saint grants the madman’s wish, and later that day the shepherds of King Meldred capture him, beat him with clubs, then cast him into the river Tweed where his body is pierced by a stake, thus fulfilling his prophecy.

Welsh literature has examples of a prophetic literature, predicting the military victory of all of the Celtic peoples of Great Britain who will join together and drive the English – and later the Normans – back into the sea. Some of these works were presented as prophecies of Myrddin; while others such as the Armes Prydein were not.

Clas Myrddin, or Merlin’s Enclosure, is an early name for Great Britain stated in the Third Series of Welsh Triads.[4]

Geoffrey of Monmouth

The modern depiction of Merlin began with Geoffrey of Monmouth. His book Prophetiae Merlini was intended to be a collection of the prophecies of the Welsh figure of Myrddin, whom he called Merlin. He included the Prophetiae in his more famous second work, the Historia Regum Britanniae. In this work, however, he constructed an account of Merlin’s life that placed him in the time of Aurelius Ambrosius and King Arthur, decades before the lifetime of Myrddin Wyllt. He also attached to him an episode originally ascribed to Ambrosius, and others that appear to be of his own invention. Geoffrey later wrote the Vita Merlini, an account based more closely on the earlier Welsh stories about Myrddin and his experiences at Arfderyd, and explained that the action was taking place long after Merlin’s involvement with Arthur. However, the Vita Merlini did not prove popular enough to counter the version of Merlin in the Historia, which went on to influence most later accounts of the character. One exception to this is the work of Count Nikolai Tolstoy titled The Coming of the King.

References

Notes

  1. Seymour, Page 9
  2. Arthurian Period Sources, Page 45
  3. Phillimore, Page 175
  4. Rhys: Hibbert Lectures, p. 168.

Sources

  • Seymour, Camilla & Randall, John (2007) Stobo Kirk: a guide to the building and its history. Peebles: John Randall
  • Tolstoy, Nikolai (1985) The Quest for Merlin. ISBN 0-241-11356-3
  • Morris, John (gen. ed.) (1980) Arthurian Period Sources volume 8, Phillimore & Co, Chichester (includes full text of The Annales Cambriae & Nennius)
  • Phillimore, Egerton (1888), “The Annales Cambriae and Old Welsh Genealogies, from Harleian MS. 3859”, in Phillimore, Egerton, Y Cymmrodor, IX, Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, pp. 141 – 183.

External links

Excerpt 29 – An addict’s values

An addict values substances and acting-out an addictive behavior, more than he/she values you or your love.

This is a devastating and horrific truth to come to accept.

During the period of coming to accept this truth, there will be a tremendous amount of denial and wishing for a different outcome, followed always by the devastation of low self-worth. Recovery from this state will occur when you finally value your own self more that the addict values you.

You will continue to seek the Devil’s approval until you leave the Darkness. This requires taking pain.

“Easy woman, you are speaking to the man I love” (Thomas Jackson)

Excerpt 27 – Expanding

Spiritual seeking or seeking God is a quest into the unknown; that which is beyond your current understanding. It is about expanding.

It is important that God is unknown. The more we try to pretend we “know” God, the less honest the quest becomes.

We are not supposed to feel safe and secure – life is insecure. Instead we put insecurity aside and honestly seek.

This is the day of the expanding man
I take one last drag as I approach the stand
==Donald Fagen

 

Excerpt 26 – Enlightenment

As opposed to achieving some fixed form of high wisdom, I think enlightenment is more the idea that insight comes on an as-needed, when-needed basis. And that it is not to be treated as currency, nor can one be materialistic with it.

This is my complaint with traditional religion. The idea that if you are a good boy, and save up all your good deeds [ideas] you get some sort of cumulative reward for being a good spiritual materialist.

Instead I’m leaning more toward the idea of seasons, timing, alignment of factors, instinct, intuition. I think intuition is the sum total of many instantaneous surges of enlightenment. They become imprinted on your being and are later there but not as intellect but more-so as intuition. They inform your choices which could be seen as enlightenment in action.