Category Archives: Mens work

Behind Dark Wings

Whose are these dark eyes that stare diamond-like from behind dark wings?

That carry the shadow of a small boy that loathes his own vessel.

 

The shame of not being the same.

The shallow stoney grave scratched in the path by fear.

 

I will wipe the lipstick from the child’s face

and hold you in the excellence of my heart

 

I will throw witchcraft at your smokescreens

and gold your beauty

and will tenderly touch your cheek

with the back of god’s hand

 

I love you in this instant of a stolen moment

 

For love values the other

as it values its self

© 2017 Martin H Wilde

Medicine Cards: Fox

Fox: Camouflage

Wiley Fox has many allies in the woodlands, including the foliage, which offers protection and much medicine. Fox is seemingly able to vanish amidst the lush undergrowth of the forest. This flora is Fox’s ally. The ability to meld into one’s surroundings and be unnoticed is a powerful gift when one is observing the activities of others.

Another natural gift of Fox is the ability to adapt to winter by changing color, like the chameleon. Its rich, white, winter coat allows Fox to blend into the snow when the leaves no longer linger. Fox medicine involves adaptability, cunning, observation, integration, and swiftness of thought and action. These traits may also include quick decisiveness, and sure-footedness in the physical world.

Fox’s ability to be unseen allows it to be the protector of the family unit. If danger arises, Fox is johnny-on-the- spot. Nanih Waiya, Great Spirit in the Choctaw tongue, honors Fox with the duty of keeping the family together and safe. This is accomplished through Fox’s ability to observe undetected, without making others self-conscious. Fox is always concerned with the safety of family members and is an excellent talisman for those traveling far afield.

If Fox has chosen to share its medicine with you, it is a sign that you are to become like the wind, which is unseen yet is able to weave into and through any location or situation. You would be wise to observe the acts of others rather that their words at this time. Use your cunning nature in a positive way; keep silent about who and what and why you are observing. In learning the art of camouflage, you need to test your ability to pull this off.

One test of exercise that may be helpful to you is deciding to be invisible. In doing this exercise, you might try to visualize your body as part of your surroundings, full of the colors of the location you are in. See yourself in your mind’s eye, moving with stealth and grace, unheeded by others. If you do it right, it works! You can leave a party unnoticed or become as unobtrusive as a piece of furniture, watching the developing drama of the subjects you are studying.

While learning from Fox, you might also gain confidence in your ability to know instantly what will happen next. After observing for a while, you will become aware of a certain predictability in given situations and be able to quickly make your move. Fox medicine teaches the art of Oneness through its understanding of camouflage. This applies on all levels, from rocks to God. With Fox medicine, you are being asked to see all types of uses for Oneness.

Much like the clowns at the rodeo, Fox can keep the raging bull from stampeding a friend or family member. Fox can use silly tactics as a brilliant camouflage move. No one could guess the sly power behind such ingenious maneuvers.

Contrary
Watch out for wiley Fox if this card has appeared reversed! Someone may be watching you, and trying to figure out your next move. If you look deeper, however, it may be that you are watching yourself to prove to yourself that you exist. If you have a “wallflower” to the point of disappearing, you may need to decide that you are worth noticing.

Contrary Fox is as foolish as it is cunning, and you may have fooled yourself into believed that your low self-esteem is due to your being born plain or having an ordinary life. This is camouflage of a different sort, in that you have camouflaged your true desire to experience life with friends, with you, and with purpose. In any case, you are put on notice to be aware of apathy and self-induced boredom. You may have to dig deeply to find what excites you enough to scurry across the wasteland of your dulled senses and live.

Contrary Fox may also be telling you that you have become too visible. In climbing to a place of recognition, oftentimes the envy or jealousness of others is thrown in your face. If you are feeling attacked, withdraw. It may be time to assume the attitude of the hermit and deck yourself in the cloak of invisibility.

To right contrary Fox in this situation, call on Armadillo and name your boundaries. Then call on the family’s protector to show you the art of camouflage. Once out of the line of attack, you can resume the role of being your “foxy” self.

Become Fox and feel the joy of knowing the playground of your life. You may just find the chicken coop full of intriguing morsels of delight.

Overview
Fox is associated with cunning, primarily because f its ability to observe the movements of others without being seen. As a power animal, Fox stresses the power of adaptability and integration coupled with the quality of quick-thinking and decisiveness when the time is ripe.

Power animals always express the positive aspects of the characteristics they share with their physical counterparts, and Fox is not exception. Fox as a power animal teaches not the cunning of deceitfulness, but kenning of discretion; not the wilyness of being sly, but the willingness of being unobtrusive. It also stresses the importance of waiting patiently for the appropriate opportunity to make your move.

It is possible that your principal problems derive from your desire to prove yourself, and to make your presence felt. If you are feeling threatened, or the victim of controversy and criticism, or envy and jealousy, you are in need of Fox’s help in becoming less noticeable and in achieving your aims unheeded and unimpeded by others. Camouflage and be less noticeable.

Blend in. Avoid being the center of attention. Become protective when needed.

Source: Sams, Jamie and Carson, David. Medicine Cards (Santa Fe: Bear and Company, 1988).

Myrddin Wyllt

Myrddin Wyllt (Welsh: [ˈmərðɪn ˈwɨɬt]), Myrddin Emrys, Merlinus Caledonensis, or Merlin Sylvestris[1] (a legendary figure associated in some sources with events in the sixth century), is a figure in medieval Welsh legend, known as a prophet and a madman. He is the most important prototype for the modern composite image of Merlin, the wizard from Arthurian legend.

Texts about Myrddin Wyllt have similarities to an account of a north-British figure called Lailoken. He was probably born sometime around or in AD 540, and is said to have had a twin sister called Gwendydd or Gwenddydd or Languoreth. Myrddin Wyllt is said to have gone mad after the Battle of Arfderydd at Arthuret, which was waged between the victor Rhydderch Hael or Riderch I of Alt Clut and Gwenddoleu in AD 573.[1] He fled into the forest and lived with the animals. There he is said to have found his gift of prophecy.[citation needed]

Myrddin reportedly prophesied his own death, which would happen by falling, stabbing, and drowning. This was fulfilled when a gang of jeering shepherds drove him off a cliff, where he was impaled on a stake left by fishermen, and died with his head below water. His grave is reputed to lie near the River Tweed in the village of Drumelzier near Peebles, although nothing remains above ground level at the site.[1] This strange threefold death is a theme common to many Indo-European mythologies, and according to Georges Dumezil suggests a strong threefold division in Proto-Indo-European religion.

In Welsh literature

The ‘altarstone’ in Stobo Kirk on which Merlin was converted to Christianity.[1]

The earliest (pre-12th century) Welsh poems that concern the Myrddin legend present him as a madman living an existence in the Caledonian Forest but said to be born in Carmarthen South Wales. Carmarthen in the Welsh language is Caerfyrddin; caer translates into English as “fort”. When Britannia was a Roman province, Carmarthen was the civitas capital of the Demetae tribe, known as Moridunum (from Brittonic *mori-dunon meaning “sea fort”). Legend has it that second part of the towns name fyrddin was representative as Myrddin and of his place of birth, Caer-fyrddin (Fort-Merlin). There he ruminates on his former existence and the disaster that brought him low: the death of his lord Gwenddoleu, whom he served as bard. The allusions in these poems serve to sketch out the events of the Battle of Arfderydd, where Riderch Hael, King of Alt Clut (Strathclyde) slaughtered the forces of Gwenddoleu, and Myrddin went mad watching this defeat. The Annales Cambriae date this battle to AD 573,[2] and name Gwenddoleu’s adversaries as the sons of Eliffer, presumably Gwrgi and Peredur.[3]

A version of this legend is preserved in a late fifteenth-century manuscript in a story called Lailoken and Kentigern, which probably happened in August 584, after Myrddin, also known as Lailoken, had finished writing his prophecies in July of that year. In this narrative, St. Kentigern meets in a deserted place with a naked, hairy madman who is called Lailoken, although said by some to be called Merlynum or Merlin, who declares that he has been condemned for his sins to wander in the company of beasts. He adds that he had been the cause for the deaths of all of the persons killed in the battle fought on the plain between Liddel and Carwannok. Having told his story, the madman leaps up and flees from the presence of the saint back into the wilderness. He appears several times more in the narrative until at last asking St. Kentigern for the Sacrament, prophesying that he was about to die a triple death. After some hesitation, the saint grants the madman’s wish, and later that day the shepherds of King Meldred capture him, beat him with clubs, then cast him into the river Tweed where his body is pierced by a stake, thus fulfilling his prophecy.

Welsh literature has examples of a prophetic literature, predicting the military victory of all of the Celtic peoples of Great Britain who will join together and drive the English – and later the Normans – back into the sea. Some of these works were presented as prophecies of Myrddin; while others such as the Armes Prydein were not.

Clas Myrddin, or Merlin’s Enclosure, is an early name for Great Britain stated in the Third Series of Welsh Triads.[4]

Geoffrey of Monmouth

The modern depiction of Merlin began with Geoffrey of Monmouth. His book Prophetiae Merlini was intended to be a collection of the prophecies of the Welsh figure of Myrddin, whom he called Merlin. He included the Prophetiae in his more famous second work, the Historia Regum Britanniae. In this work, however, he constructed an account of Merlin’s life that placed him in the time of Aurelius Ambrosius and King Arthur, decades before the lifetime of Myrddin Wyllt. He also attached to him an episode originally ascribed to Ambrosius, and others that appear to be of his own invention. Geoffrey later wrote the Vita Merlini, an account based more closely on the earlier Welsh stories about Myrddin and his experiences at Arfderyd, and explained that the action was taking place long after Merlin’s involvement with Arthur. However, the Vita Merlini did not prove popular enough to counter the version of Merlin in the Historia, which went on to influence most later accounts of the character. One exception to this is the work of Count Nikolai Tolstoy titled The Coming of the King.

References

Notes

  1. Seymour, Page 9
  2. Arthurian Period Sources, Page 45
  3. Phillimore, Page 175
  4. Rhys: Hibbert Lectures, p. 168.

Sources

  • Seymour, Camilla & Randall, John (2007) Stobo Kirk: a guide to the building and its history. Peebles: John Randall
  • Tolstoy, Nikolai (1985) The Quest for Merlin. ISBN 0-241-11356-3
  • Morris, John (gen. ed.) (1980) Arthurian Period Sources volume 8, Phillimore & Co, Chichester (includes full text of The Annales Cambriae & Nennius)
  • Phillimore, Egerton (1888), “The Annales Cambriae and Old Welsh Genealogies, from Harleian MS. 3859”, in Phillimore, Egerton, Y Cymmrodor, IX, Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, pp. 141 – 183.

External links

I used to know how to walk on water

I used to know how to walk on water
I used to be so unafraid.
I could save the weakest tyrant
And I could knight the proudest slave
I could give riches to beggars
And give love to the one who hates
I could tempt a whore so frozen
And I could torture the strength of fate

I used to know how to walk on water
The king of kings they knew me well
I could give sight to blind men
And make a mute man sing in hell
But now I watch with awe and wonder
Doubt has now befallen me
I ask The Lord to show me mercy
And to give me sympathy

Forgive me now my useless thunder
When I was such a dynamo
I am here and I am humble
For I know not which way to go

I used to know how to walk on water
I could give the dead hot life
I could murder the joy of Satan
And make his mistress be my wife
I will be the dream of cowards
And they will never resemble me
I could see them doubt me under
As I set each one free
Now I just sit and wonder what
illness has befallen me.
This sick of mine make me surrender to
this world of vacancy

Forgive me now my useless thunder
When I was such a dynamo
I am here and I am humble
For I know not which way to go

I used to know how to walk on water
Now I sink in the dirt
No kind of holy laughter
Seems to reach beyond the hurt
I used to know how to walk on water
I used to be at peace with love
All it’s strength and all it’s power
Would lift me up so high above
Burning star of holy wonder
Women would rush to be with me
But now I’m lost inside the thunder of pain
which holds insanity

Forgive me now my useless thunder
When I was such a dynamo
I am here and I am humble
For I know not which way to go

Forgive me now my useless thunder
When I was such a dynamo
I am here and I am humble
For I know not which way to go

==Joseph Arthur

Excerpt 29 – An addict’s values

An addict values substances and acting-out an addictive behavior, more than he/she values you or your love.

This is a devastating and horrific truth to come to accept.

During the period of coming to accept this truth, there will be a tremendous amount of denial and wishing for a different outcome, followed always by the devastation of low self-worth. Recovery from this state will occur when you finally value your own self more that the addict values you.

You will continue to seek the Devil’s approval until you leave the Darkness. This requires taking pain.

“Easy woman, you are speaking to the man I love” (Thomas Jackson)

Excerpt 27 – Expanding

Spiritual seeking or seeking God is a quest into the unknown; that which is beyond your current understanding. It is about expanding.

It is important that God is unknown. The more we try to pretend we “know” God, the less honest the quest becomes.

We are not supposed to feel safe and secure – life is insecure. Instead we put insecurity aside and honestly seek.

This is the day of the expanding man
I take one last drag as I approach the stand
==Donald Fagen

 

Excerpt 26 – Enlightenment

As opposed to achieving some fixed form of high wisdom, I think enlightenment is more the idea that insight comes on an as-needed, when-needed basis. And that it is not to be treated as currency, nor can one be materialistic with it.

This is my complaint with traditional religion. The idea that if you are a good boy, and save up all your good deeds [ideas] you get some sort of cumulative reward for being a good spiritual materialist.

Instead I’m leaning more toward the idea of seasons, timing, alignment of factors, instinct, intuition. I think intuition is the sum total of many instantaneous surges of enlightenment. They become imprinted on your being and are later there but not as intellect but more-so as intuition. They inform your choices which could be seen as enlightenment in action.